Daub

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Clay which is smeared onto a structure of timber or wattle (interwoven twigs) as a finish to the surface. It is normally added to both faces of a wall and is used to keep out drafts and give a smooth finish. The material usually survives only when baked or fire-hardened, as would be the case if a structure burned down. It can usually be recognized by the impressions of the wattle to be found on its inner face. It was used by both Indians and European settlers in North America to construct houses.

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A clay-based material, acting as the matrix in a wattle and daub wall. The daub is plastered on to the wattle framework and allowed to dry, forming a quick and relatively weathertight structure. The imprint of wattle has survived on some ancient daub from archaeological sites.

The Macmillan dictionary of archaeology, Ruth D. Whitehouse, 1983Copied

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